Social and leisure dance

There are still a few hours left (UK time) to book your place on the Teaching Social and Leisure Dance, short online CPD course for dance teachers.

This is an ideal course if you are already teaching a form of social and leisure dance and if you currently teach structured dance classes for those looking to have a career in dance then this course will be useful to you too.

Teaching social and leisure dance is different to teaching strict technique. Social and leisure dance encourages people to learn in a fun and relaxed environment and in a safe manner. And the emphasis is on the social benefits of this type of dance class or event.

A real mix of dance teachers have taken this course previously. Ballroom, Line dance and   ballet and other teachers have already enjoyed this course. It offers an opportunity to explore teaching methods and approaches in social and leisure dance as well as a variety of other, useful aspects of teaching social and leisure dance classes.

Line dance teachers have particularly enjoyed exploring some of the areas of teaching that are new to them or just a new way of thinking about some aspect of teaching Line dancing. This previous article about Line dancing and teacher CPD might interest you.

The personal weekly tutorial emails tailor the course to suit your own dance teaching practice and teachers find this a particularly helpful aspect of these courses.

Find out more about this course and later courses. And you can book here.

Booking and email address

When you book a course please remember that the email you give when you book will be the email that you will be contacted on about the course. So please check it to make sure you don’t miss any information about your course.

You will receive an email after you book and also one near to the start of the course. Should you wish to use a different email address for your course please send this in after you have booked or when responding to one or our emails before your course starts.

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Courses starting 4 January 2019 – extended closing date – book now

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To give you the opportunity to book one of the courses starting 4 January 2019 the closing date has been extended to the end of the year. So you can book until midnight on Monday, New Year’s Eve (UK time).

These short online courses are a great way to get some CPD under your belt. They offer personal feedback and in this way are tailored to your own dance teaching practice.

There are two courses available to book starting on 4 January:

Proprioception

Teaching Social and Leisure Dance

You can download an information sheet about these courses here.

You can also book other courses starting later in January and February.

Don’t forget you can sign up to follow CPD for Dance Teachers for free and get notifications when new information is added to the site. Click on the link in the sidebar.

 

 

 

Season’s Greetings

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A big thank you to all whom I worked with in 2018. Warm wishes for the festive season.

The new year is just around the corner now. If you are thinking about doing some CPD at the beginning of the year then take a look at the courses coming up. Do remember to check the closing date for course bookings so you don’t miss out on the course/s that you want to take.

Don’t forget we have two brand new courses on the January – March 2019 list.

Enjoy whatever you are doing over the holiday season and I look forward to a new year of courses in 2019. I hope you will join me on a CPD course soon.

Warmest wishes

Sho

 

Courses for January – March 2019

 

Sample certificateBookings are now open for courses taking place during January – March 2019.

You can book one or more courses right now and get off to a good CPD start for 2019.

As well as established courses there are two brand new courses on the list:

Child Development for Dance Teachers – this course will focus on key child development matters for dance teachers teaching children from two years up to pre-adolescent (there is already a course for Teaching Adolescents which will run again later next year).

Teaching Dance for Health – a growing area in dance teaching. This course will explore key aspects of teaching dance from a health perspective. This is something I have done a lot of during my career and we will draw from my own experiences of teaching dance for health together with basic models of Health Education and Promotion.

Go to the Book a Course page and get your course/s booked for early 2019. I hope to have an opportunity to work with you in the new year.

 

 

 

A breath in dance

Dancing in your head anywhereAs a young dancer I was encouraged to breathe when I danced. I am not talking about making a huge thing about breathing. Rather it was about taking a breath to enhance the step or movement I was about to perform and also to assist in making hard work in dance look reasonably calm or easy. There was no point in performing a beautiful dance but then looking as if you were about to expire from not being able to catch your breath. So breathing was part of my training and I think in many ways this training was ahead of its time in its thinking and approach.

Stamina demanding dance

Take the demands of Highland dancing as one example – a very stamina demanding form of dance. When constantly hopping and springing throughout a whole dance it is easy for the dancer to begin to look tired and out of breath. Paying attention to the breathing can help with pacing the dancer as well as stamina. If a dancer loses all of his or her breath each times she lands from a hop, spring or jump then he or she will very quickly be out of puff and this will quickly show in the carriage and poise of the dancer. Breathing well in dance will enhance good stamina rather than reducing it. Having good stamina and good breathing is a terrific combination.

As breathing was part of my training it felt natural to breath well and use the breath to enhance whatever dance genre I was performing. I found that taking a breath at the right time for me in dance made a difference to how I felt and also how the movement looked. Getting the breathing right can help to make a performance appear light, airy and effortless instead of heavy and full of effort.

Working with the breath, to me, is a vital part of dance. If you have downloaded and read my booklet Preparation for Performance then you will know that teaching breathing in dance is something I have been involved with from way back in the 1970s.

Relaxation

In addition to using breathing techniques in dance I have also been involved in teaching relaxation techniques to dancers of all ages for many years including teaching relaxation techniques in the workplace, within wellbeing workshops and stress management courses. I guess it is not surprising that my journey of the breath has taken me into mindfulness and the mindful breath too. Learning about and practising mindful breath offers yet another aspect of how the breath and the body work together.

Breathe and focus

In dance, breathing can be a good way to begin releasing tension in the body. I find that taking time to breathe (a few deep breaths in and out) before starting teaching a class or taking part in a class is a great way to focus and prepare your mind for what you are about to do. Being present in the moment when teaching and participating is a different experience to teaching whilst being distracted by something else or dancing whilst thinking of something else. Why not try, taking a few breaths to focus on what you are doing right now and see how it feels? Does it feel feel different to be fully present in the moment?

Currently my Tension & Rigidity course is running and another course that is relevant to this post is my Mindfulness in Dance Teaching. You can find out about all the short online CPD courses that I do for dance teachers by clicking here.

There are also earlier posts that you might want to read such as: Mindfulness in Dance Teaching and Highland Dancers Achieving Steady Raised Arms and Relaxation Technique. Breathing is a great topic to explore for dancers and dance teachers. It has a lot to offer for your own wellbeing as well as that of your dancers. I hope you will take a look at it in more depth and see what it has to offer.