Physics of the hardest move in ballet

Creative people over at TED-Ed Original have produced a great educative, animation video about The physics of the ‘hardest move’ in ballet – the fouetté. If you have ever struggled with performing or teaching fouettés then this short video will interest you.

 

 

Did you enjoy the video? What did you learn from it? If you have found it useful for your performing or teaching then please leave a comment below that others might find helpful.

 

 

Dancing to keep young

Sea & skyDriving home this evening I heard on the radio that Journalist, Angela Rippon has a new, two part show being aired on Thursdays 7 and 14 April 2016 on BBC 1, 9pm.

She spoke about dance being scientifically good for us because it ticks all the boxes such as, fitness, flexibility, core stability, socialisation and keeps the brain active remembering all those steps and dances. She spoke passionately about older people dancing and how good it is for people in their 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s. Having taught ladies and gents of 80 plus and even on or two of 90 plus I can confirm how well they respond to dancing as long as it is taught and danced at a pace they can cope with.

The first of Angela Rippon’s programmes is apparently about keeping the body young and the second one is about keeping the brain (or mind) young. They seem worth watching if you can.

It is always good to hear someone speak passionately about older people dancing. I think the genres she mentioned specifically are ballet, Line dancing and belly dancing. So quite a range and why not? Dancing is not just for the young. It has so much to offer people of all ages.

If you are interested in teaching older people to dance or already teach classes for older people then why not take the short online CPD course starting in May: Learning and Teaching Dance: teaching dance to older people?

And don’t forget you can now pay for your courses online via Paypal and credit cards.

 

 

When can I start pointe work?

Young dancers often want to know when they can start pointe work. And an answer of around 12 years of age is usually given. But really it is not the age of the dancer that we need to pay attention to but the kind of dance student that is asking.

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